Tiny illustrations in a book about illustrations (?!? Reviewed in the United States on March 31, 2009. I've been told Unfolding the Napkin (the workshop version of this book) is a far better read if you want to implement Visual Thinking in your work. This was an fantastic book and it should be required reading for anybody in business. الكاتب كتابته سلسة جدا و ممتعة. I was surprised by how much I got out of this! Everything about this book is too small, including the type font. Instead, for a book on using pictures to communicate, it is extremely wordy. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Proposal: Business Book of the year 2008 !! The Back of The Napkin The subtitle of Dan Roam’s best-selling book, The Back of the Napkin is “Solving problems and selling ideas with pictures” – a reasonable description of what designers do for a living. Interesting read with compelling visual materials, although still a bit above the average read. As I’ve been working as a consultant for many years, the book didn’t give me any new insights and that’s why I gave it 3 stars. The ideas given are fresh, and I do find them directly applicable to those who are either more suited to these kind of communication media, or for those who wants to add a little zing to their presentation. Since I'm a visual thinker who often turns to pictures to think things out, this helped me reflect on ways I can further refine my methods. Instead it aims to convey its ideas to the general public, demystifying the use of our innate visual thinking. About halfway through this. My appreciation for the book grew considerably towards the end. The book began with the 5 W's (Who, What, When, Where, Why...) and finished with process flow diagrams and XY charts. I can imagine it would be helpful for those who don't turn to pictures first, to see how they can be a great way to. The Back of the Napkin contains instruction and useful examples of how to get your message across simply and effectively. This is a book about using graphic illustrations to communicate. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Be the first to ask a question about The Back of the Napkin. Arguably, it does get a little weird trying to look at the tabulated template of sorts, but nonetheless, this book, I feel, would be able to give her readers a certain degree of confidence, and knowledge on how to communicate more visually, and more importantly, more effectively. Anyone, however, who needs to learn how to display data to convince others (data visualization) will find this book useful. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures at Amazon.com. By traversing through the 6 "W" questions (i.e. Since I'm a visual thinker who often turns to pictures to think things out, this helped me reflect on ways I can further refine my methods. I read The Back of the Napkin (Expanded Edition) on my Amazon Kindle Basic. Roam takes you from the beginning - square one where to start - to the end - how to present your ideas in a presentation - both the pictures and words. I propose rule #1 for graphic communications; graphics have to be easy to see and read if they are to have impact. If you are thinking you have nothing more to … It might be helpful for those of us who like to use visual activities as inquiry tools. See details below . Refresh and try again. Start by marking “The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures” as Want to Read: Error rating book. I love the concept, and there were some awesome, quotable sections (I especially liked the difference between LOOKING and SEEING). Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas by Dan Roam is an easy read that helps us think about ways that pictures can help us solve problems. The first time I read the original version of this book, it was an ebook. I said yes, only to learn later that the speech was to take place in Sheffield, England (we were in New York), to an audience of educational experts appointed by the then-new British prime minister, Tony Blair. “The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures” explores the power an image can yield as a conveyor of ideas or concepts. Reviewed in the United States on July 12, 2008. He gives a good guide to visual thinking process we go through naturally. This page works best with JavaScript. It contains a couple ideas worth remembering, but it's pretty sparse on information. The Back of the Napkin had a great impact on the way I think and solve problems. I thought this book could be organized in a better manner for easier understanding. The difficulty in reading the illustrations, many of which have short words and/or numbers packed into a small area around the graphic elements, distracts greatly from the flow of information. Examples of effective, simple, basic shapes are introduced at the beginning. While I love to read books on my Kindle, I would have to say that charts and most pictures are basically lost when using the Kindle. Reviewed in the United States on March 27, 2009. تعلمت الكثير، و أظن أن الأفكار التي وردت في الكتاب يكمن جمالها في قابلية تطبيقها في مختلف المجالات و الأمور. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. However the central points of the book are better presented in workshop form than just simply reading about it for optimal retention. So why only three stars? But one aspect that I do find this book lacking is the seemingly technical details that it is trying to force o. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations, Select the department you want to search in. It might be helpful for those of us who like to use visual activities as inquiry tools. I found a lot to use here for motivational reference. One isn't really the fault of the author as such, it's more my fault for reading it.