Highly nutritious, the leaves taste like spinach, but the plant is a member of the beet family. Swiss chard grows well with many different plants. Bolting occurs when a vegetable or herb starts to rapidly produce flowers, and this typically makes it inedible. Simply remove the chard to give more space to the beans. Celery is a compact plant that doesn’t get … Swiss chard produces light pollen which easily travels by wind. A common cause of bolting is heat. Leaves: The thick, ruffled leaves have a stiff mid-rib and heavily veined leaves. Corn will compete for nutrients and make it too shady. Chard can grow with some shade; plant on the shady side of a pole bean trellis. Beautiful Swiss chard perfect for both vegetable and flower beds. Before you start to plant your chard take some time to work in lots of compost or aged manure into the planting bed. Swiss chard is high in vitamins A, E, K and C and the minerals magnesium, manganese and iron. It can also help prevent insect attacks or even promote growth. Although many herbs are well-known for their insect-repelling qualities, unfortunately chard doesn’t get along with most of them. Plants that don’t make good companions might compete with or shade chard, or the chard may expand into their space. Swiss Chard with Flowers. A common cause of bolting is heat. The chard grows considerably taller than bush beans, but it is usually ready to harvest before the beans are ready. Cucurbits like melon and cucumbers may attract beetles that also like to nibble on chard leaves. The Basics of the Swiss Chard Plant . Beans also add nitrogen to the soil and don’t compete with chard for nutrients. The beauty of growing yours in a container is that you can move it to a cooler spot to prevent this. Swiss chard like most greens will do best in rich soil. Swiss chard can be used as an ornamental plant and food source in a container garden. Swiss Chard Dislikes. Grows best in full sun but will tolerate partial shade and even appreciates it in hot climates. Flowers contain both types of reproductive organs (perfect flowers). Potatoes, corn, cucumber and melons don’t make good companion plants for chard. Leaves: The thick, ruffled leaves have a stiff mid-rib and heavily veined leaves. Swiss chard prefers cooler temperatures, so once the thermometer climbs up past 75°F or drops below freezing, your plants may bolt. If it starts to flower simply cut the flower stock off and the chard will keep making new leaves. The Basics of the Swiss Chard Plant . Swiss chard like most greens will do best in rich soil. That said, chard tends to resist bolting much better than other leafy greens like spinach. Swiss chard can come in a variety of colors, including white, pink, yellow, green, red and orange. For example, you could plant tomatoes next to the chard and basil next to the tomatoes. The leaves grow from a crown, at the base of the plant. Potatoes, corn, cucumber and melons don’t make good companion plants for chard. Chard can get fairly large at maturity, especially if you want it to winter over so you can save seed. Large leaves with a prominent, flat wide mid-rib grow in a colorful, upright rosette. Generally speaking, chard is a plant that does not bolt in the heat of summer, but it can happen. Companion plants mustn’t be too small or they can be crowded out. Companion planting often makes for a prettier garden, with flowers and herbs scattered throughout. In others, they may deter insect pests such as soil nematodes. Submitted by The Editors on May 6, 2019 - 3:25pm. Chard also has a few it doesn't want for neighbors. Its colorful leaves are beautiful in edible landscaping and ornamental plantings. The leaves grow from a crown, at the base of the plant. Swiss chard develops small, green flowers on top of the flowering stem during the second year of growth. Corn will compete for nutrients and make it too shady. Swiss chard is not only delicious and nutritious, but eminently ornamental. Swiss chard can come in a variety of colors, including white, pink, yellow, green, red and orange. However, you can choose companions that will mature after the chard is ready; harvestingthe chard leaves space for them to grow on. Celery. Chard leaves have lots of flavor on their own and a tenderness somewhere between spinach and kale: Soft enough for fresh salads and quick sautés, but hearty enough for braises and bakes. You might have a glut of Swiss chard in your garden or seen bunches at the farmers' market. However, the taste of chard once it starts to flower can be more bitter. Celery is another traditional silver beet companion. Just as you don’t get along with all neighbors, chard has a few it prefers not to associate with. The idea behind companion planting is that all plants exude chemicals through their roots, leaves and stems. In some cases – as with walnuts – these chemicals can actually inhibit the growth of nearby plants. The one exception is anything in the mint family, which does pair well with chard. Swiss chard produces large, shiny, dark green, ribbed leaves with long, white, yellow or red petioles. Chard does particularly well with two different plant families. If it starts to flower simply cut the flower stock off and the chard will keep making new leaves. To repel nematodes, plant marigolds a full year before the chard. It would certainly be worth trying out, as long as the soil is rich and stays relatively moist. Swiss Chard Dislikes. Corn will compete for nutrients and make it too shady. Before you start to plant your chard take some time to work in lots of compost or aged manure into the planting bed. Just as you don’t get along with all neighbors, chard has a few it prefers not to associate with. In the cole or brassica family, plant chard with: The bean family is another group that offers good companions for chard. As such, planting Swiss chard in containers does double duty; it provides a showy backdrop for other plants and flowers and since for most of us our seasonal color plantings are located near an entry to the home, makes for easy picking. However, the taste of chard once it starts to flower can be more bitter. Just as you don’t get along with all neighbors, chard has a few it prefers not to associate with. Potatoes, corn, cucumber and melons don’t make good companion plants for chard. These recipes will help you use it all, from simple sautés to quiches and soups. Swiss chard tolerates warm (and even hot) temperatures and dry conditions like a champ. You can get around this dislike by putting a chard companion next to the herb.