soft white semisolid fat obtained by rendering the fatty tissue of the hog, an edible emulsion of fat globules made by churning milk or cream; for cooking and table use, a fighter who strikes the opponent with his head. Butter contains 45 percent "healthy" fat. To garnish or strew, especially with reference to words or phrases in speech and writing. The density of butter is 911 g/L (0.950 lb per US pint). a pale yellow edible fatty substance made by churning cream and used as a spread or in cooking. Butter is a dairy product containing up to 80% butterfat (in commercial products) which is solid when chilled and at room temperature in some regions and liquid when warmed. It is an ingredient in various savoury dishes such as sausages, pâtés and fillings, and it is particularly favored for the preparation of pastry because of the "flakiness" it brings to the product. Its unmodified color is dependent on the animals' feed and genetics but is commonly manipulated with food colorings in the commercial manufacturing process, most commonly annatto or carotene. (obsolete) Fatty meat from a pig; bacon, pork. fat from the abdomen of a pig that is rendered and clarified for use in cooking. The main difference between Lard and Butter is that the Lard is a pig fat in both its rendered and unrendered forms and Butter is a dairy product. The main difference between Lard and Butter is that the Lard is a pig fat in both its rendered and unrendered forms and Butter is a dairy product. To stuff with bacon; to dress or enrich with lard; esp., to insert lardons of bacon or pork in the surface of, before roasting; as, to lard poultry. Lard is just the reverse, more unsaturated fats than saturated fats, which makes it a “better fat” as the present-day thinking goes. Fat from the abdomen of a pig, especially as prepared for use in cooking or pharmacy. the internal fat of the abdomen; also, this fat melted and strained. Butter remains a solid when refrigerated, but softens to a spreadable consistency at room temperature, and melts to a thin liquid consistency at 32–35 °C (90–95 °F). Lard contains 60 percent healthy fat. Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; Fat from the abdomen of a pig, especially as prepared for use in cooking or pharmacy. Butter has unsaturated fats in its lipid mix, but it has more saturated fats. Using data from the Canadian Nutrient File – a federal food nutrient database – De Santis compared one tablespoon of lard versus butter. (uncountable) Any of various foodstuffs made from other foods or oils, similar in consistency to, eaten like or intended as a substitute for butter (. But it doens’t have to be. It shouldn’t be a scary word, especially in the kitchen. Salt such as dairy salt, flavorings and preservatives are sometimes added to butter. Butter consists of butterfat, milk proteins and water, and in some types, added salt. We do not implement these annoying types of ads! He found … Think of it like this: lard comes from pork. The simple answer: lard and butter. We've detected that you are using AdBlock Plus or some other adblocking software which is preventing the page from fully loading. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional terms may apply. Refined lard is usually sold as paper-wrapped blocks. That’s right—fat! Its use in western contemporary cuisine has diminished with the increased popularity of vegetable oils, but many contemporary cooks and bakers still favor it over other fats for certain select uses. (uncountable) A soft, fatty foodstuff made by churning the cream of milk (generally cow's milk). The fat of swine, esp. (countable, obsolete, chemistry) Any specific soft substance. We don't have any banner, Flash, animation, obnoxious sound, or popup ad. It can be rendered by steaming it or boiling it in water and then separating the insoluble fat from the water, or by the use of dry heat. To move one's weight backwards or forwards onto the tips or tails of one's skis or snowboard so only the tip or tail is in contact with the snow. To increase, as stakes, at every throw or every game. Most frequently made from cows' milk, butter can also be manufactured from the milk of other mammals, including sheep, goats, buffalo, and yaks. (slang, obsolete, transitive) To increase (stakes) at every throw of dice, or every game. Lard has about half as much saturated fat as butter, but about double the saturated fat found in olive oil. To stuff (meat) with bacon or pork before cooking. As verbs the difference between lardand butter Lard is pig fat in both its rendered and unrendered forms. To increase (stakes) at every throw of dice, or every game. As such, the lard also produced a flat, crumbly crust with noticeable greasiness. Butter may also be sold with added flavourings, such as garlic butter. This could get complicated. Rendering butter produces clarified butter or ghee, which is almost entirely butterfat. As a cook, you should know and love fat. See Wiktionary Terms of Use for details. It’s even said that the saturated fats that are present in lard have a … It is made by churning fresh or fermented cream or milk to separate the butterfat from the buttermilk. It stands to reason, since both lard and shortening are 100 percent fat (as compared to butter, which is roughly 85 percent fat and 15 percent water) and behave very similarly. In many ways, this crust was quite similar to the shortening version. It is a semi-soft white fat with a high saturated fatty acid content and no transfats. A soft, fatty foodstuff made by churning the cream of milk (generally cow's milk). We need money to operate the site, and almost all of it comes from our online advertising. It is obtained from any part of the pig where there is a high proportion of adipose tissue. Any substance resembling butter in degree of consistence, or other qualities, especially, in old chemistry, the chlorides, as butter of antimony, sesquichloride of antimony; also, certain concrete fat oils remaining nearly solid at ordinary temperatures, as butter of cacao, vegetable butter, shea butter. It generally has a pale yellow color, but varies from deep yellow to nearly white. Like Najeeb said, the more natural the food is, the “healthier” it is. Any of various foodstuffs made from other foods or oils, similar in consistency to, eaten like or intended as a substitute for butter (preceded by the name of the food used to make it). The culinary qualities of lard vary somewhat depending on the part of the pig from which the fat has been taken, and how the lard is processed. There is cholesterol in lard, about the same amount as found in butter, about 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 100 grams of fat. To mix or garnish with something, as by way of improvement; to interlard. Most of the healthy fat in lard is oleic acid, the same healthy fat found in olive oil. It is generally used as a spread on plain or toasted bread products and a condiment on cooked vegetables, as well as in cooking, such as baking, sauce making, and pan frying. “The difference between lard and butter is that lard is made up of 50% monounsaturated fat whereas butter is around 32%. Please add askdifference.com to your ad blocking whitelist or disable your adblocking software. Butter is a water-in-oil emulsion resulting from an inversion of the cream; in a water-in-oil emulsion, the milk proteins are the emulsifiers. to move one's weight backwards or forwards onto the tips or tails of one's skis or snowboard so only the tip or tail is in contact with the snow. Lard is commonly used in many cuisines around the world as a cooking fat or shortening, or as a spread similar to butter. is that lardis fat from the abdomen of a pig, especially as prepared for use in cooking or pharmacy while butteris (uncountable) a soft, fatty foodstuff made by churning the cream of milk (generally cow's milk) or buttercan be someone who butts; someone who butts in. To mix or garnish with something, as by way of improvement; to interlard. (cooking) to stuff (meat) with bacon or pork before cooking, to garnish or strew, especially with reference to words or phrases in speech and writing. An oily, unctuous substance obtained from cream or milk by churning. "I've got to give up fags and shift some lard", insert strips of fat or bacon in (meat) before cooking, "he larded the joint with garlic and anchovies", smear or cover (a foodstuff) with lard or fat to prevent it drying out during storage, "farmhouse cheeses are dipped in wax or larded", embellish (talk or writing) with an excessive number of esoteric or technical expressions, "his conversation is larded with quotations from Coleridge", "the pages were larded with corrections and crossings-out".