His improvisations utilized very wide intervals, a variety of nonmusical speechlike sounds, and its own logic. His maverick techniques on the bass clarinet gave birth to the instrument’s legitimacy in the jazz genre. Dr. Andrew Hill performed the same compositions from the “Point of Departure” album at a live concert at Lincoln Center outside in the 1990s ! Those who have been put off by unfair criticisms of Dolphy “caterwauling,” might want to check out how he spices the ensembles of Chico Hamilton and Oliver Nelson, or the sophisticated hard-bop swagger he fosters in band he co-led with trumpeter Booker Little – “Fire Waltz,” from their date at the Five Spot in July ’61 is a good example. There are a raft of other iconic Dolphy blowing sessions and intrepid forays to the fringes where boppish free jazz resides. Dolphy’s first extended stint with Mingus in 1960 inspired both to new heights. Écoutez de la musique en streaming sans publicité ou achetez des CDs et … You’ll find the best tracks among be any of the Dolphy-Davis duets, including alternate takes, on Musical Prophet: The Expanded 1963 Studio Sessions. Burke. Eric Dolphy was a true original with his own distinctive styles on alto, flute, and bass clarinet. The Monk tribute “Hat and Beard,” hits the bullseye on Monk’s angular simplicity and irresistible lyricism via the songcraft and Dolphy opening bass clarinet solo. He was also one of the first (after Coleman Hawkins) to record unaccompanied horn solos, preceding Anthony Braxton by … Découvrez Future Perfect (for Eric Dolphy - bass clarinet) de Ken Vandermark sur Amazon Music. After a nearly three-year absence that included celebrated recordings with Coleman and Coltrane, and his own ensembles, Dolphy returned to Mingus in 1963 with more spectacular results. Although the alto was his main axe, Dolphy was the first flutist to move beyond bop (influencing James Newton) and he largely introduced the bass clarinet to jazz as a solo instrument. Eric Dolphy [Eric Allan Dolphy Jr.] (born June 20, 1928, Los Angeles, CA; died June 29, 1964, Berlin, West Germany; aged 36), alto sax, bass clarinet, flute. Charles Mingus, a man famed for his quick temper, remarked of him that he was a man “absolutely without a need to hurt”. But that tends to obscure the pure heart and soulfulness that pervades Dolphy’s discography. Its unique mélange of arresting attributes doesn’t add up easily. And trumpeter Freddie Hubbard nearly held his own in the front line beside Dolphy in full flower on all three instruments. He was also one of the first (after Coleman Hawkins) to record unaccompanied horn solos, preceding Anthony Braxton by five years. Think we’ve missed one of the best Eric Dolphy tracks? (The one from The Illinois Concert seems especially durable.). An avant-garde jazz innovator, fluent on several reed instruments, who pushed bop to its outer limits. But it is the opposite of “anti-jazz,” the epithet most often thrown at Dolphy and other avant-garde jazz musicians. Eric forever❤️, Love almost forgot about a Virtouso. The unconventional flair of Out To Lunch! As for the solo flute, Dolphy has a couple of stellar versions of “Glad To Be Unhappy,” but nothing can top the heartrending performance of “You Don’t Know What Love Is,” that he performed the same month that he died, which appears on the record, Eric Dolphy—Last Date. Required fields are marked *. I had the honor of meeting him after the concert ! Dolphy’s contributions to some of Coltrane’s most spirited versions of “My Favorite Things,” stand out, with a relatively obscure live version recorded in Hamburg and included on John Coltrane: The European Tours a particularly good example. His music fell into the "avant-garde" category yet he did not discard chordal improvisation altogether (although the relationship of his notes to the chords was often pretty abstract). It helps that his songwriting had grown increasingly sophisticated. Pressed to name one, go for the original, aptly named, “Alone Together.”, It seems fitting to select a solo piece on each of Dolphy’s three primary instruments. On Out To Lunch!, he tapped all of these things and crystallized his own distinctive identity. The longest of the three renditions of the 1936 ballad “Love Me” is just 3:40, but Dolphy (on alto) packs it with slippery quicksilver phrases, mixed with dynamic intensity and well-chosen pauses to enhance its swing. These are his best tracks. Will dig Further. New Jack Swing Fashion And Style: A Photo Essay, Best David Sylvian & Japan Songs: A Singular Musical Mind, ‘E=MC2’: Mariah Carey’s 2008 Album Is A Celebration, ‘Feeling Good’: Nina Simone’s Joyous Emancipation Anthem. The knotty but ever-fascinating exchanges between Dolphy (again on bass clarinet) and the then-22-year old pianist Herbie Hancock on the 1928 show tune, “Softly, as in a Morning Sunrise,” from The Illinois Concert in 1963 also deserves mention. ON Candid. hey clarnibass, i wouldn't worry about dolphy's bass clarinet setup because even if you had it. For example the spectacular playing on Oliver Nelson’s “Straight Ahead”. The titanic composer and bassist Charles Mingus exerted the greatest influence over Dolphy’s development. Dolphy’s ascendant profile stemmed from his pervasive role in a turbulent, more unstructured music that was shaking the foundations of bebop much as bop had rattled swing jazz 15 years before. Then, from “Far Cry”, the shimmering beauty of “It’s Magic” is not to be missed. For the vast majority of Dolphy’s too-brief career, his most vivid and important recordings were usually under the aegis of another bandleader. Underrated but Immortal❤️❤️❤️. An avant-garde jazz innovator, fluent on several reed instruments, who pushed bop to its outer limits. The vibes of Bobby Hutcherson floated and flurried with polytonal, flexibly tensile give-and-take that a pianist couldn’t match, creating a springboard for Dolphy. He issued breathtakingly beautiful and somber performances in both solo and duet settings on alto saxophone, bass clarinet and flute. Eric Dolphy was a true original with his own distinctive styles on alto, flute, and bass clarinet. Although emblazoned arpeggios were inevitably the trademark of Eric Dolphy’s best tracks, he was masterful enough to render them within a classic bop or songbook context that galvanized their conservative context. God bless the child His music fell into the "avant-garde" category yet he did not discard chordal improvisation altogether (although the relationship of his notes to the chords was often pretty abstract). His music fell into the “avant-garde” category yet he did not discard chordal improvisation altogether (although the relationship of his notes to the chords was often pretty abstract). It is a tragedy that we all were never able to discover what came next from Eric Dolphy. Eric Dolphy’s solo and duet recordings are simultaneously thoughtful and soulful, tender and passionate. Perhaps no other record has more effectively utilized the elastic guard rails of bebop with the liberating quest to explore new musical territory. He stays on the low-toned horn for the well-named, “Something Sweet, Something Tender,” provides scintillating flute on “Gazzelloni,” and injects wrings out the alto sax on the title track and “Straight Up and Down,” with darts, skids and slurs that variously lope, compress, quicken, and swing into space. John Coltrane was given his flute and bass clarinet upon his death, and according to his biography used to travel with a photograph of their owner. That changed with Out To Lunch!, his lone album for the fabled Blue Note label. Listen to the best Eric Dolphy tracks on Apple Music and Spotify, and scroll down for our best Eric Dolphy tracks. The bass clarinet workout on “Ralph’s New Blues”, and the alto on the title track are extraordinary. or Mingus ! Although the alto was his main axe, Dolphy was the first flutist to move beyond bop (influencing James Newton) and he largely introduced the bass clarinet to jazz as a solo instrument. Bassist Richard Davis retained his telepathic connection with the leader and teamed with a teenaged Tony Williams who had already started changing the face of jazz drumming with Sam Rivers, Jackie McLean and Miles Davis. Mingus was Dolphy’s longest-lasting and most extensive musical relationship, and the two were most comfortable living on the cusp of musical structure and improvisational freedom. (“Mandrake,” from the previous summer, most accessible on Musical Prophet, may be the best harbinger of what was to come.) While on tour in Berlin in June 1964, the multi-instrumental virtuoso — whose solos on alto saxophone, bass clarinet and flute zoomed and zig-zagged like rogue comets — suffered sudden … Bathe in the way his dulcet bass clarinet adds texture and harmony to John Coltrane’s enduring ballad, “Naima,” on its November 3, 1961 performance contained on the Trane’s “Complete Village Vanguard Sessions.”.